Macropods 

kangaroos and wallabies

Before you begin caring, you will need to have some basic items on hand.  You will not be offered an animal to raise until you have some of the basic necessary items.  Many items are things you may already have around the house, but it will be necessary to purchase some. 

Aviaries and cages can sometimes be picked up cheap second hand - look in the papers/internet for give-a-ways.

Shopping list for new carers

 

o   Divetelact – unused milk powder can be frozen until needed.  All milk powders must be kept in the fridge to keep them fresh.

o   Bottles and teats – depending upon species

o   Syringes for tiny babies and difficult feeders

o   Pouches – small rectangle of fabric folded in half and both sides sewn, leaving an opening at the top.  The babies feel safe in a pouch.  You will need a few of these in case of ‘accidents’.

o   Basket with a clip on lid and air flow.  Cat carry cages can be used so long as there are no gaps for escapes.

o   Heat pads or hospital box for stable warmth for small babies.  Hot water bottles wrapped in towels or microwavable packs are also acceptable.  Snuggles Safe heat pads.

o   Small towels, old nappies – used for extra warmth around the pouch, between baby and the heat pad so as not to over heat or burn it.

o   Cages for inside play – a cockatoo cage is a suitable size for a young possum.  Wire needs to be close enough to prevent a small animal escaping.

o   Suitable non tipping bowls for feeding.

o   Aviary for when the baby gets bigger – floor needs to be wired to prevent predators getting in to the possum. 

o   Caring records (to be filled in on a regular basis)



 

 

o   Esky/poly styrene box (broccoli box is ideal)

o   Hot water bottles

o   Blankets/towels

o   Flannelette pouches of different sizes

o   Temperature gauge (with separate probe)

o   Teats/feeding bottles (vanilla essence type bottles)

o   Milk formula (Divetelact, Wombaroo or Biolac)

Other items you will require:

 

o   Tissues (lots of) or rolls of toilet paper

o   Caring records (to be filled in on a regular basis)

o   Adequate fencing

o   Grassed garden space and garden (could be eaten)

Last but not least:

o   Telephone, and numbers of experienced carers

o   Time and patience

 

o   All sorts of seeds, lori wet/dry and hand rearing mix.

o   Feeding spoons.

o   Syringes

o   Hospital box or heat pad for warmth

o   Lamps or heat pack

o   Cages for inside use, cocky size is preferable

o   Aviaries, at least 1.5m by 1.5 m for most birds.  Larger birds like kookaburras and tawny frogmouths need at least 3m by 3m for flight/gliding skills development.

o   Betadine - Diluted for wounds

o   Caring records (to be filled in on a regular basis)

 

Flying foxes and Insectivorous Bats

o   LYSSA VIRUS INJECTIONS you must have your injections before you take care of any bat.

o   Attend a Bat Workshop – these are held Sep/Oct just before the season starts.

o    Solid carry cages can be used but Styrofoam eskies or other eskies are preferable so that the bats do not damage their wings.  Punch holes in the lid for air flow.

o   Basket with a clip on lid and air flow. 

o   Heat pads or hospital box for stable warmth for small babies.  Hot water bottles wrapped in towels or microwavable packs are also acceptable. 

o   Small towels, old nappies – used for extra warmth around the pouch, between baby and the heat pad so as not to over heat or burn it.

o   Bottles and teats – depending upon species

o   Caring records (to be filled in on a regular basis)


 

Flying-Foxes

Flying-Fox Colony - M. Wall

Possums

Tilly - A. Thompson

Luna - released Brushtail - R. & J. Le-Bherz

Birds

Rainbow Lorikeet - T. Goulter

Goanna - L. Christensen

Reptiles 

o   Suitable aquariums or cages to prevent the animal from escaping.

o   Heat pads or heat packs

o   Caring records (to be filled in on a regular basis)